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How a judge has the power to resolve a breach of contract

| Jul 15, 2021 | Contract Disputes |

Civil court judges have all of the necessary authority to solve your contract dispute with another business or vendor. Sometimes, you will have no choice but to go to court over contract issues.

When another party breaches their agreement with you, you will probably try to resolve the issue on your own. However, many individuals and companies will dig in their heels when confronted with a failure rather than apologizing and fulfilling their obligations.

If you can’t convince someone to deliver the goods they promise to you or complete the services you contracted them for, going to court to litigate the breach of contract may be the only solution.

A court order can compel the other party to complete their contractual obligations

When you go to court over a contract dispute, the judge will look at the validity of the contract and the behavior of all of the parties involved. If they agree with you that the contract is valid and that the other party failed to fulfill their obligations to you they have the authority to issue a court order resolving the entire matter.

If you want the other party to follow through on the contract, a judge ordering specific performance could be the optimal outcome to a breach of contract issue. The ruling in your lawsuit can effectively compel the other party to follow through with the agreement in the contract. If they do not, they could face additional consequences due to their violation of a court order.

Judges also have the power to invalidate contracts or to award damages to companies hurt by contract issues. Knowing how the courts can solve business disputes can assist you in better responding to an outstanding contract issue.

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